Tuesday, December 1, 2015

NCHS Data Brief

Prevalence of Obesity Among Adults and Youth: United States, 2011–2014
Number 219, November 2015
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Cynthia L. Ogden, Ph.D.; Margaret D. Carroll, M.S.P.H.; Cheryl D. Fryar, M.S.P.H.; and Katherine M. Flegal, Ph.D.

Key findings

Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

  • In 2011–2014, the prevalence of obesity was just over 36% in adults and 17% in youth.
  • The prevalence of obesity was higher in women (38.3%) than in men (34.3%). Among all youth, no difference was seen by sex.
  • The prevalence of obesity was higher among middle-aged (40.2%) and older (37.0%) adults than younger (32.3%) adults.
  • The prevalence of obesity was higher among non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic adults and youth than among non-Hispanic Asian adults and youth.
  • From 1999 through 2014, obesity prevalence increased among adults and youth. However, among youth, prevalence did not change from 2003–2004 through 2013–2014.

What was the prevalence of obesity among adults in 2011–2014?

The prevalence of obesity was 36.5% (crude estimate) among U.S. adults during 2011–2014. Overall, the prevalence of obesity among middle-aged adults aged 40–59 (40.2%) and older adults aged 60 and over (37.0%) was higher than among younger adults aged 20–39 (32.3%). No significant difference in prevalence was observed between middle-aged and older adults (Figure 1).
Overall, the prevalence of obesity among women (38.3%) was higher than among men (34.3%). For adults aged 20–39 and 40–59, the prevalence of obesity was higher among women than among men, but the difference between older women and men aged 60 and over was not significant.
Among both men and women, the prevalence of obesity followed a similar pattern by age. Men aged 40–59 (38.3%) had a higher prevalence of obesity than men aged 20–39 (30.3%). Women aged 40–59 (42.1%) had a higher prevalence of obesity than women aged 20–39 (34.4%). The prevalence of obesity among men and women aged 20–39 was lower than among men and women aged 60 and over, except the difference for men was not significant.
Source of Information http://www.cdc.gov
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